SAQs

Now that you have completed this study session, you can assess how well you have achieved its Learning Outcomes by answering the following questions.

Explain briefly why a Water Safety Plan is necessary.

Show answer

A Water Safety Plan is necessary to ensure that the water that is produced and delivered to consumers is safe. It also ensures that the chance of an incident disrupting the continuous supply of water is minimised.

Arrange the steps of the Water Safety Plan shown below in the right order:

  • Prepare management procedures.
  • Identify the hazards and hazardous events.
  • Define the monitoring system for each control measure.
  • Assemble a team of experts.
  • Develop supporting programmes.
  • Prepare a verification programme to check that the Water Safety Plan is working.
  • Describe the water supply system.
  • Carry out a risk assessment and prioritise the risks.
  • Identify the control measures needed for each risk.
  • Document all of the steps.

Show answer

The correct order is:

  1. Assemble a team of experts.
  2. Describe the water supply system.
  3. Identify the hazards and hazardous events.
  4. Carry out a risk assessment and prioritise the risks.
  5. Identify the control measures needed for each risk.
  6. Define the monitoring system for each control measure.
  7. Prepare management procedures.
  8. Prepare a verification programme to check that the Water Safety Plan is working.
  9. Develop supporting programmes.
  10. Document all of the steps.

Look at Figure 8.8, which shows a well that is the sole water source for a village. Based on what you can see in the photograph, undertake the following:

  • Hazard assessment
  • Risk assessment
  • Identification of the control measures needed for each risk
  • Definition of the monitoring system for each control measure.

Figure 8.8 A potential abstraction point for drinking water.

Show answer

Your answers should be along the following lines:

Hazard assessment: The well is open and presents several hazards. There is no wall around it, so people or animals can contaminate the water easily, either by entering the water, or by people using contaminated utensils or containers when collecting water. There is a possibility of surface water running into it, and also wind-blown debris entering the water.

Risk assessment: The risk of contamination is high, especially since it is the sole source of water for the village, so the risk assessment score will also be high.

Identification of control measures needed for each risk: A metre-high concrete wall around the well will be an effective means of preventing direct contact with the water. A rope-and-pulley system should be set up with a bucket so that water can be drawn from the well. This water can then be put into containers brought by the people. A wall will also keep out surface run-off and wind-blown debris.

Definition of the monitoring system for each control measure: Regular inspection (say, monthly) of the wall must be undertaken to ensure that it is not cracked. The pulley-and-bucket system should also be checked (say, weekly) to ensure that it is working properly and is kept clean. The bucket should be checked for cracks.

Last modified: Monday, 3 October 2016, 5:43 AM