Family or community resistance

24. Traditional methods have protected my family for generations. Why should I believe immunisation will be better for my child?

25. My husband refused to let me bring the baby back for more immunisation because the last time our baby received an immunisation, they fell sick. What can I do?

26. How can I convince my husband to give me transport money to bring our baby for the next immunisation?

27. Don’t vaccines contain some prohibited materials? I do not want such materials in my child.

24. Traditional methods have protected my family for generations. Why should I believe immunisation will be better for my child?
    • It might seem hard to believe that immunisation makes a difference because we don’t often see the harmful effects of these diseases anymore.
    • Before immunisation was widely taken up, families expected one or more of their children to die before reaching the age of five years. Many of these children died from measles, polio, TB, whooping cough and tetanus.
    • Today, immunisation protects children from these and other diseases, so more children grow well and survive.


25. My husband refused to let me bring the baby back for more immunisation because the last time our baby received an immunisation, they fell sick. What can I do?
    • It is true that sometimes a baby develops a mild fever after receiving a vaccine. This is a “side effect” of immunisation rather than a real sickness. 
    • Side effects are milder and not as serious as an actual attack of the diseases that immunisation prevents.
    • Almost all side effects will disappear in a short time. A lukewarm bath or paracetamol can bring down the child’s temperature.
    • If your husband is still concerned, I can come talk to him or he can visit the clinic to learn more about vaccines and their safety.


26. How can I convince my husband to give me transport money to bring our baby for the next immunisation?
    • You are not alone in having this problem.
    • You might start by reminding your husband that the baby depends on both of you for his/her security, growth, and development.
    • Explain that immunisation can save the family money by preventing diseases that would need to be treated—sometimes with expensive medicines or many visits to the clinic or hospital.
    • If your husband does not change his mind, please try very hard to set aside enough money to bring your child in – for his/her sake and for your family’s sake.


27. Don’t vaccines contain some prohibited materials? I do not want such materials in my child.
    • Vaccines are made mainly from germs, or pieces of them, that cause the diseases. However, the germs in vaccines have been weakened or killed so they are no longer harmful to the child.
    • To ensure that vaccines remain sterile, effective and safe, they also contain very small amounts of some chemicals that have been tested extensively and found to be safe.
    • Vaccines are designed to be acceptable to people of all religions. This is important because for immunisation to protect the most people, as many people as possible need to be immunised.




Last modified: Friday, 19 October 2018, 4:03 AM